The Salvation Army

  • Employability Support (Scottish Government)

    The Salvation Army response to the Scottish Government consultation on Employability Support. Submitted on 6th November 2015.


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  • The Future Delivery of Social Security in Scotland

    Salvation Army response to an inquriy into the Future Delivery of Social Security by the Welfare Reform Committee of the Scottish Parliament. Submitted August 2015. 


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  • Alcohol (Licensing, Public health and Criminal Justice) (Scotland) Bill - June 2015

    A response from the Salvation Army to the Alcohol (Licensing, Public health and Criminal Justice) (Scotland) Bill - June 2015.


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  • Second consultation on a new tenancy for the private rented sector - May 2015

    The Salvation Army in Scotland is grateful for the opportunity to respond to this second consultation.

    Our responses are based on two perspectives – first as a provider of homeless services, including hostels (Lifehouses), drop-in centres, resettlement services and floating support. The majority of the service users that we help to resettle tend not to move into the private rented sector, but for those that do we try to ensure that they find appropriate and secure tenancies when they move on from our hostels or resettlement flats. Also, some of the service users referred to The Salvation Army have become homeless from the private rented sector. Security of tenancy is therefore of concern to us.

    Our second perspective is that of a provider of private rented accommodation. There are occasions when we rent out vacant houses that are normally used to accommodate Salvation Army Officers (Christian ministers). Therefore, we see the need for tenancies that allow us to repossess a property at the appropriate time.

    Because of these two perspectives our responses to the consultation attempt to take a balanced approach between the rights and responsibilities of tenants and landlords.


    Email scotland@salvationarmy.org.uk
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  • Support for Children (Impact of Parental Imprisonment) (Scotland) Bill

    At HMP Edinburgh, The Salvation Army manages Scotland’s only purpose-built visitors’ centre on behalf of The Onward Trust. The centre receives roughly 41,000 adult visitors and 7,700 child visitors each year. All the visiting family and friends of the prisoners are booked in by the visitors’ centre, which has a café and children’s area. The staff members (who include a part-time children’s worker) provide information and a supportive, friendly and non-judgmental environment.

    We recently produced a set of three booklets covering themes highlighted by children visiting the prison and including illustrations by them: Visiting Dad, Visiting Mum and A Parents Guide.

    Our responses to this consultation are based on our work with families at HMP Edinburgh.


    Email scotland@salvationarmy.org.uk
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  • Human Trafficking and Exploitation (Scotland) Bill - February 2015

    The Salvation Army believe that the needs of victims should be central to any response to human trafficking, whether legislative, strategic or operational. These proposals are welcome because they do keep victims central, both by tackling offenders and supporting victims.


    Email jonathan.roberts@salvationarmy.org.uk
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  • Consultation on Proposals to Introduce a Statutory Duty of Candour for Health and Social Care Services (Scottish Govt) - January 2015

    The Salvation Army agree that any organisation providing social care should be open and transparent in all its dealings with its service users. They support legislation that requires organisations to have systems and procedures to ensure openness and transparency and therefore agree with the proposed duty of candour in principle.

    The Salvation Army Scotland is grateful for the opportunity to respond to this consultation. They provide services in a number of social care settings, including care homes and housing support services. They therefore respond from the standpoint of a social care provider rather than a health services provider.


    Email jonathan.roberts@salvationarmy.org.uk
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  • Consultation on Proposals for an Offence of Wilful Neglect or Ill-treatment in Health and Social Care Settings

    An official response from the Salvation Army to the Scottish Government's consultation on Proposals for an Offence of WilfulNeglect  or Ill-treatment in Health and Social Care Settings.


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  • Consultation on a new PRS tennancy

    Our responses are based on two perspectives – first as a provider of homeless services, including hostels (Lifehouses), drop-in centres, resettlement services and floating support. The majority of the service users that we help resettle tend not to move into the private rented sector, but for those that do we try to ensure that they find appropriate and secure tenancies when they move on from our hostels or resettlement flats. Also, some of the service users referred to The Salvation Army have become homeless from the private rented sector. Security of tenancy is therefore of concern to us.

    Our second perspective is as a provider of private rented accommodation. There are occasions when we rent out vacant houses that are normally used to accommodate Salvation Army Officers (Christian ministers). Therefore, flexibility of tenancies that allow us to repossess a property at the appropriate time is also of concern to us.

    Because of these two perspectives our responses to the consultation attempt to take a balanced approach between the rights and responsibilities of tenants and landlords.


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  • Housing (Scotland) Bill 2014

    The Salvation Army Scotland is grateful for the opportunity to respond to this consultation. They do so from the perspective of a provider of homelessness services, which include hostels, resettlement services and floating support.

    The majority of the service users that the Salvation Army help to resettle tend not to move into the private rented sector. However, there are some of service users referred to The Salvation Army who have become homeless from the private rented sector due to the poor condition of the property, poor landlords or the lack of appropriate support.

    Therefore any new legislation to improve the private rented sector would help towards preventing homelessness, as well as providing a more meaningful move on option. They regard the designation of EEAs as a positive step where evidence exists that the issues are serious enough to make it is necessary.


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